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A Late Bloomer: where is China’s climate plan?

Summary:
The world awaits China's concrete plan on carbon reduction, but the country is following its own pace. Check the previous editions of ZhōngHuá Mundus Sign up for the newsletter As the largest global emitter of greenhouse gases, China is key to the success of the upcoming COP26 and the global effort for climate neutrality by the mid-century. Yet two months ahead of the Glasgow convention, China has yet to present a concrete policy path to become net-zero by 2060. Why is China taking so long to announce its carbon reduction plan? Giuseppe Porcaro hosts Bruegel China expert Alicia García-Herrero, climate economist Simone Tagliapietra and Dr. Michal Meidan, Director of the China Energy Research Program from the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, to discuss climate, Chinese affairs and

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The world awaits China's concrete plan on carbon reduction, but the country is following its own pace.

Check the previous editions of ZhōngHuá Mundus

Sign up for the newsletter

As the largest global emitter of greenhouse gases, China is key to the success of the upcoming COP26 and the global effort for climate neutrality by the mid-century. Yet two months ahead of the Glasgow convention, China has yet to present a concrete policy path to become net-zero by 2060. Why is China taking so long to announce its carbon reduction plan? Giuseppe Porcaro hosts Bruegel China expert Alicia García-Herrero, climate economist Simone Tagliapietra and Dr. Michal Meidan, Director of the China Energy Research Program from the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, to discuss climate, Chinese affairs and energy economics.

Sound Money Economics System was a fringe political party in Manitoba, Canada, during the provincial election of 1941.

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