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The very first students arrived at LSE 120 years ago this year, on 10 October 1895. We are celebrating the people, places and sometimes quirky events that make up the story of LSE, from 1895 to 2015. Look out for events, blog posts, publications, video and audio telling you more than you ever thought you could possibly want to know about what has made LSE one of the world’s most influential seats of learning.

London School of Economics

Reviving a different type of competition to develop the European economy

Several EU leaders have set their sights on curbing the power of big tech firms in Europe. Patrick Kaczmarczyk writes that it is unlikely the United States will accept this without the threat of retaliation. Due to its export-led model, the EU is vulnerable to such pressures. It is time for the EU to embrace a different theory and model of development, one that rethinks the idea of competition for its own sake. With France and the Netherlands joining calls to curb the power of (mostly...

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Interview with Daniela Haarhuis: “Security can’t be achieved through the violation of human rights”

The growth of new technology is having an increasing impact on security policy, yet the pace of technological change also has important implications for human rights. In an interview with EUROPP’s Managing Editor, Daniela Haarhuis discusses how governments and citizens can seek to resolve the paradox between human rights and security politics. Security and human rights issues are closely related, but there is occasionally a lack of clarity in how academics approach the two topics. How...

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Book Review: Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of Capitalism by Mareile Pfannebecker and J.A. Smith

In Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of Capitalism, Mareile Pfannebecker and J.A. Smith address the problems in the prevailing discourse on work and outline how exactly we can put a post-work future into practice. As 2020 has witnessed the reshaping of work and workplaces due to the Covid-19 pandemic, this thought-provoking book offers a valuable starting point for envisaging a future post-work world, writes Anupama Kumar. Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of...

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The UK and the EU: Another two-level game

The prospects for a post-Brexit trade deal between the UK and the EU look increasingly bleak following talks between EU leaders on 15 October. Bob Hancké attempts to make sense of the negotiations. Finally, the gloves are off. French president Macron, a bit more preoccupied with containing a new outbreak of Covid-19 than with Brexit, has turned the tables and told Boris Johnson to ‘go whistle’. If the UK wants a Brexit agreement before the end of the year, it is going to have to accept...

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Why rapid integration policies for refugees may harm long-term integration into the labour market – especially for women

National governments typically implement a range of policies to help integrate refugees into the labour market. Drawing on a new study, Vilde Hernes, Jacob Arendt, Pernilla Joona Andersson and Kristian Rose Tronstad show that policies focused on rapid self-sufficiency for newly arrived refugees may hamper the development of stable labour-market integration in the long-term. This effect is particularly prominent in the case of women. Integrating refugees into the labour market has...

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Lessons from EMU: Understanding the trade-offs between procedural and substantive accountability

The EU is frequently criticised for lacking democratic accountability. Mark Dawson and Adina Maricut-Akbik draw a distinction between ‘procedural accountability’, which focuses on whether actors follow the correct procedural steps in reaching a decision, and ‘substantive accountability’, which assesses the value of a policy decision itself. They argue there should be greater attention paid to the potential trade-offs associated with each approach, particularly in light of the notably...

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The median voter is dead – long live political moderation!

Ever since the financial crisis, centrist and establishment politics has been suffering a deepening loss of legitimacy and voter loyalty in Europe and the United States. The median-voter strategy of the Blair and Clinton years has been criticised for good reason, writes Richard Bronk. But might political moderation be about to make a comeback as the world faces up to unprecedented challenges on multiple fronts? The vote for Brexit and the election of Donald Trump in 2016 seemed to...

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Why the EU’s enlargement process is running out of steam

On 6 October, the European Commission released its enlargement reports, tracking the progress of countries aiming to join the EU. Florian Bieber writes that while the reports were longer than ever, the details drown out the bigger picture. He argues the reporting process should be reformed to better outline priorities, highlight the causes of problems, and make concrete proposals for the next steps in the accession process. The release of the EU’s enlargement reports has moved from...

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Book Review: The Case for Scottish Independence: A History of Nationalist Political Thought in Modern Scotland by Ben Jackson

In The Case for Scottish Independence: A History of Nationalist Political Thought in Modern Scotland, Ben Jackson offers a new history of the political and theoretical debates that have provided the intellectual foundations for Scottish nationalism as a social and political movement. This is a hugely important contribution to British political history and a work that will doubtlessly become part of the canon on Scottish politics, writes Jennifer Thomson.  The Case for Scottish...

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Can member states override the Court of Justice of the EU?

Rulings made in the Court of Justice of the European Union often generate controversy in the member states, but how can national governments respond to decisions they disagree with? Drawing on a new study, Olof Larsson explains the use of ‘overrides’, where laws are changed following a ruling to bring them more in line with what national politicians want. According to many scholars, the member states of the EU are essentially trapped in a legal system they no longer control. Important...

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