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Book Review: Sexual Politics in Modern Ireland

‘Sexual Politics in Modern Ireland’ sets out to explore gender, sex and sexuality using new data to explore stories that have yet to be told, and to add to our understanding of who and what makes up Irish society. Muireann O’Dwyer writes that the book is not a comprehensive overview of the role and experience of sexual politics in modern Ireland, but rather a diverse range of topics that explores the gaps in gender studies within Irish history. Sexual Politics in Modern...

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Saving the euro at all costs could lead to the hollowing out of European democracy

Since the financial crisis, a process of change has been underway which has seen a new model of technocratic financial and economic governance take hold across Europe. Alexander Ruser argues that these reforms, motivated by a desire to save the euro ‘at all costs’, could bring about the hollowing out of democracy, with the will of the people increasingly coming secondary to the demands of financial markets. Abraham Lincoln defined democracy as government of the people, by the people, for the...

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Rumours of the euro’s likely demise are greatly exaggerated

To what extent do the problems illustrated by the Greek debt crisis threaten the future of the Eurozone? Iain Begg writes that while the prospects for Greece continue to be deeply uncertain, the wider reforms that have been pursued across the Eurozone since the crisis still give reason for optimism about the future of the single currency. Since 2009, when the extent of the problems in Greece’s public finances first became known, Europe’s leaders have struggled to contain the ensuing crisis....

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The grand divergence: global and European current account surpluses

Global current account imbalances widened before the 2007/2008 crisis and have narrowed since. While the post-crisis adjustment of European current account deficits was in line with global developments (though more forceful), European current account surpluses defied global trends and increased. We use panel econometric models to analyse the determinants of medium-term current account balances. Our results confirm that higher fiscal balances, higher GDP per capita, more rapidly...

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Greece: Lessons for Europe

  This op-ed was originally published in Die Zeit, Linkiesta and Publico. The dreadful stand-off is over, for the moment: Greece and its creditors have started work on a third rscue package. However, debate continues about what lessons can be drawn from the failure of the previous programmes. The IMF’s Chief Economist, Olivier Blanchard, recently published an important paper about just this.  When he defends the IMF’s main decisions, one can agree with much of what he says. It was...

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Forty years later, the signing of the Helsinki Final Act continues to have an impact on European security

The Ukraine crisis dramatically raised the profile of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), with the OSCE playing a role in discussions between Russia, Europe and the United States. It also provided an opportunity for the organisation to demonstrate its continued relevance to European security, forty years after the signing of the so called ‘Helsinki Final Act’ in 1975, which served as the foundation for the establishment of the OSCE. Martin D. Brown and Angela...

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The lesson from the Greek crisis should be that economics exists for the good of society, not for its own sake

A Greek bailout deal has been agreed in principle between the country’s government and its creditors. Defne Gonenc writes that throughout the crisis there has been a tendency to view economics as detached from politics, with the impact of economic policies on individual citizens largely pushed to the sidelines in discussions surrounding the technicalities of a bailout deal. She argues that rather than pursuing economics for its own sake, a better approach would be to adopt a narrative that...

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The decline in market liquidity

What’s at stake: There has been a plethora of stories on the apparent decline in trading or market liquidity over the past few months with a growing number of analysts pointing out that it has become harder for buyers and sellers to transact without causing sharp price movements. While the Fed remains unimpressed with these developments, several commentators have argued that the next crisis might come from an abrupt and dramatic re-rating of stocks and bonds.   The problem with illiquid...

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EU governments need a more effective narrative if they are to win public support for asylum policies

Migration and asylum are among the most contentious and emotionally charged of policy areas across Europe, but how can governments bring about a more pragmatic debate over asylum policy? Andrea Römmele and Henrik Schober argue that there is currently a ‘communication gap’ between governments and their citizens over the issue. Drawing on political communication literature, they propose a model for improving the public debate on asylum across Europe. When the European Union was awarded the...

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