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Eurostat: Non-EU migrants less educated, more idle than average

Summary:
The People have demanded more coverage of EU/Eurozone politics, migration and race relations in Europe, and European history (in that order). Basically, more of the same. Let it be done. Eurostat is launching “a series of publications on migrant integration.” A first press release shows that non-EU migrants are quarter less likely to be higher-educated, almost two times as likely to be idle “NEETs,” and over 2.5 times as likely to not have a high-school diploma as the native-born. This is considerably worse in all spheres than EU migrants. Eurostat goes on to note: Low education level prevails among the non-EU population living in the EU In 2014 in the EU, more than 40% (43.9%) of non-EU citizens aged 18 to 64 had a low education level, while this proportion was around 25% for both citizens of the reporting country (nationals) and for citizens of another EU Member State (23.4% and 25.9% respectively). Discrepancies were however lower for the share of the population with a high education level, which stood at 23.0% for non-EU citizens, compared with 27.3% for nationals and 31.0% for citizens of another EU Member State. EU migrants (i.e. EU citizens living in another EU country) tend to be significantly more-educated and more-likely to be working or learning than non-EU migrants.

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Eurostat: Non-EU migrants less educated, more idle than average

The People have demanded more coverage of EU/Eurozone politics, migration and race relations in Europe, and European history (in that order). Basically, more of the same. Let it be done.

Eurostat is launching “a series of publications on migrant integration.” A first press release shows that non-EU migrants are quarter less likely to be higher-educated, almost two times as likely to be idle “NEETs,” and over 2.5 times as likely to not have a high-school diploma as the native-born. This is considerably worse in all spheres than EU migrants.

Eurostat goes on to note:

Low education level prevails among the non-EU population living in the EU

In 2014 in the EU, more than 40% (43.9%) of non-EU citizens aged 18 to 64 had a low education level, while this proportion was around 25% for both citizens of the reporting country (nationals) and for citizens of another EU Member State (23.4% and 25.9% respectively). Discrepancies were however lower for the share of the population with a high education level, which stood at 23.0% for non-EU citizens, compared with 27.3% for nationals and 31.0% for citizens of another EU Member State.

EU migrants (i.e. EU citizens living in another EU country) tend to be significantly more-educated and more-likely to be working or learning than non-EU migrants. Interestingly however, the EU migrant population has both somewhat more very uneducated (no high school diploma) people and slightly more very educated (tertiary) people than the native-born. This suggests “average people” in Central-Eastern Europe are more likely to stay at home than are laborers or doctors.

Eurostat: Non-EU migrants less educated, more idle than average

Eurostat notes that women tend to be more educated and more likely to be idle for all three groups (EU migrants, non-EU migrants, and native-born).

The low level of educational attainment and the high degree of idleness of non-EU migrants both suggest they are not as great a source of economic benefits as the authorities suggest (e.g. Joschka Fischer’s claim that Europeans can only provide for grandma’s pension by replacing their hollow generations with non-European immigrants). Rather, this data suggests that non-EU migrants would be far less likely to be high-earners disproportionately contributing to the public coffers, and more likely to be low-earners or unemployed dependent upon handouts from the native majority.

The EU data presented is however not very detailed. It would be highly interesting to get the same figures broken down by country, national origin, and by generation (i.e. looking at second- and third- generation migrant integration). Crime statistics would also be interesting. This could potentially reveal some surprises and show us models of some country or immigrant group better managing than others. I would personally be very interested in the degree of intergenerational convergence. This seems to stall with the second generation but, given the lack of ethnic statistics in most European countries, it is hard to tell what is happening.

However, from the national statistics I have seen (DenmarkGreat Britain, France, Germany, the OECD in general), most non-European migrant groups perform below average across generations, thus leading to an indefinite deterioration in the host country’s human capital. Some however perform about as well or better than the native majority, such as British Indians and Vietnamese French. Most EU migrant groups seem to be near or converge to the national average quite quickly. I strongly suspect this general pattern broadly holds true across Western Europe. But we won’t know for sure until we have more detailed statistics.

Craig Willy
This is the blog of European affairs writer Craig James Willy. Elite and popular discourse on the European Union tends to have a weak relationship with reality. Both pundits and politicians – whether American liberals or conservatives, British eurosceptics or simply French – tend to project their national dreams and nightmares upon it. I have a nuanced analysis of Europe based on the primacy and diversity of national realities and on actual EU decision-making practices.

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