Tuesday , October 24 2017
Home / IFO Hans-Werner Sinn & Clemens Fuest / ifo Institute Study: German Civil Justice very Efficient but not Among the Best

ifo Institute Study: German Civil Justice very Efficient but not Among the Best

Summary:
Apr 6, 2017 The civil and commercial justice system in Germany is very efficient but not the best. And within Germany there are large differences in efficiency. These are the results of a new study by the ifo Institute. In 2012, the completion ratio in Germany was 66.6 percent, which was above the European average of 59.7 percent. Also the average duration of proceedings in 2012 in Germany at 6.1 months was better than the European average of 9.3 months. “However, Germany is not among the best in the examined indicators for efficiency. Countries such as Luxembourg, Austria, Denmark and Sweden have a higher completion ratio, shorter duration of proceedings and fewer still pending proceedings at the end of the year”, says Niklas Potrafke, Head of the ifo Center for Public Finance and Political Economy. “But a word of caution: we cannot say anything about the quality of jurisprudence. We also do not take the costs of the judicial system into consideration.” Potrafke added: “This institutional matter is nevertheless economically significant. Empirical studies show that judicial efficiency can be accompanied by higher economic growth.” In terms of civil justice in the German federal states, there are major differences: the highest completion levels in 2014 were achieved in Bavaria with 72.7 percent, Baden-Württemberg (71.

Topics:
Clemens Fuest considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Clemens Fuest writes ifo Viewpoint No. 189: Germany’s “Jamaica” Coalition and its Economic Policy

Clemens Fuest writes CESifo Newsletter 2017/07

Clemens Fuest writes Business For German Architects Better Than Ever

Clemens Fuest writes Joint Economic Forecast Autumn 2017: Upturn Remains Robust – Amid Mounting Tensions

Apr 6, 2017

The civil and commercial justice system in Germany is very efficient but not the best. And within Germany there are large differences in efficiency. These are the results of a new study by the ifo Institute. In 2012, the completion ratio in Germany was 66.6 percent, which was above the European average of 59.7 percent. Also the average duration of proceedings in 2012 in Germany at 6.1 months was better than the European average of 9.3 months.

“However, Germany is not among the best in the examined indicators for efficiency. Countries such as Luxembourg, Austria, Denmark and Sweden have a higher completion ratio, shorter duration of proceedings and fewer still pending proceedings at the end of the year”, says Niklas Potrafke, Head of the ifo Center for Public Finance and Political Economy. “But a word of caution: we cannot say anything about the quality of jurisprudence. We also do not take the costs of the judicial system into consideration.”

Potrafke added: “This institutional matter is nevertheless economically significant. Empirical studies show that judicial efficiency can be accompanied by higher economic growth.” In terms of civil justice in the German federal states, there are major differences: the highest completion levels in 2014 were achieved in Bavaria with 72.7 percent, Baden-Württemberg (71.9 percent) and Hamburg (70.7 percent). The lowest levels were in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (66 percent), Bremen (64.7 percent) and Thuringia (63.5 percent). Similar results were determined for the average duration of proceedings. The shortest durations in 2014 were in Baden-Wuerttemberg and Bavaria with 4.1 months each and in Berlin with 4.6 months. Saarland had the longest average procedural durations with 5.6 months, followed by Bremen with 5.7 months and Thuringia with 6.1 months.

“It is also striking that the efficiency of the local courts differs greatly among the federal states. This surprised us”, Potrafke added. “Unfortunately, the judicial authorities prevented a complete comparison here. Hesse and Rhineland-Palatinate provided only anonymised data which could not be assigned to the individual courts, Lower Saxony and Baden-Württemberg did not reply at all and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern explicitly refused to furnish particulars.”

Publication (in German)

  1. Potrafke, Niklas, Markus Reischmann, Marina Riem and Christoph Schinke, Evaluierung der Effizienz von Gerichtsverfahren in Deutschland, ifo Institut, München, 2017, 43 | Details | PDF Download

Clemens Fuest
Clemens Fuest took over from Hans Werner Sinn as chairman of the IFO Institute in April 2016. He is professor at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Munich.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *