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Book Review: Experiences of Academics from a Working-Class Heritage by Carole Binns

In Experiences of Academics from a Working-Class Heritage, Carole Binns draws on interviews with fourteen tenured academics from a working-class background to reveal the complexities faced by individuals who have experienced social mobility in academia. Suggesting that a diversification of the academic workforce could be a valuable addition to the widening participation agenda, this book contributes to understanding lived experiences of social mobility and the social class inequalities...

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Book Review: Me, Not You: The Trouble with Mainstream Feminism by Alison Phipps

In Me, Not You, Alison Phipps builds on Black feminist scholarship to investigate how mainstream feminist movements against sexual violence express a ‘political whiteness’ that can reinforce marginalisation and oppression and limits the capacity to collectively achieve structural change and dismantle violent systems. This short and accessible book challenges us to think deeply about how the politics of woundedness, outrage and carcerality are embedded within the feminist movement and...

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Book Review: Me the People: How Populism Transforms Democracy by Nadia Urbinati

In Me the People: How Populism Transforms Democracy, Nadia Urbinati examines populism as a form – and deformation – of representative democracy. This is a rich work, brimming with ideas about the nature of representative government, how we conceive of it and how populism interacts with these, writes Ben Margulies, and is recommended to university students and scholars seeking to learn more about democratic and populist theory. Me the People: How Populism Transforms Democracy. Nadia...

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Book Review: The European Central Bank between the Financial Crisis and Populisms by Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti, Claudia Wiesner and Sebastian Diessner

In The European Central Bank between the Financial Crisis and Populisms, the authors Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti, Claudia Wiesner and Sebastian Diessner unveil the problematic relationship between the European Central Bank and European politics, and especially the populist and sovereigntist threats to its legitimacy and independence. It reveals how at times the ECB has had no choice but to make difficult decisions that impinged on the responsibilities of fiscal authorities to...

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Book Review: Slowdown: The End of the Great Acceleration – And Why It’s Good for the Planet, the Economy and Our Lives by Danny Dorling

In Slowdown, Danny Dorling challenges the idea that we are living through an era of unprecedented economic and technological acceleration, instead putting forward an argument in favour of the inevitability and desirability of deceleration. Published in the midst of a global pandemic, Dorling’s insightful and persuasive book is a well-timed forecast that the storm will eventually subside and humankind will advance towards an era of peace and stability for all, writes Theo Curtis. ...

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Book Review: Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of Capitalism by Mareile Pfannebecker and J.A. Smith

In Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of Capitalism, Mareile Pfannebecker and J.A. Smith address the problems in the prevailing discourse on work and outline how exactly we can put a post-work future into practice. As 2020 has witnessed the reshaping of work and workplaces due to the Covid-19 pandemic, this thought-provoking book offers a valuable starting point for envisaging a future post-work world, writes Anupama Kumar. Work Want Work: Labour and Desire at the End of...

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Book Review: The Case for Scottish Independence: A History of Nationalist Political Thought in Modern Scotland by Ben Jackson

In The Case for Scottish Independence: A History of Nationalist Political Thought in Modern Scotland, Ben Jackson offers a new history of the political and theoretical debates that have provided the intellectual foundations for Scottish nationalism as a social and political movement. This is a hugely important contribution to British political history and a work that will doubtlessly become part of the canon on Scottish politics, writes Jennifer Thomson.  The Case for Scottish...

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Book Review: The Economics of Belonging: A Radical Plan to Win Back the Left Behind and Achieve Prosperity for All by Martin Sandbu

In The Economics of Belonging: A Radical Plan to Win Back the Left Behind and Achieve Prosperity for All, Martin Sandbu seeks to address the extent to which many citizens of western democracies feel ‘left behind’ by recent economic changes, proposing a detailed plan for creating a just economy where everyone can belong. While finding this a highly readable and carefully argued book that offers a number of persuasive policy prescriptions, John Tomaney questions whether it provides a...

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Book Review: Project Europe: A History by Kiran Klaus Patel

In Project Europe: A History, Kiran Klaus Patel offers a new critical history of European integration, focusing on the period between 1945 to 1992. This book offers many fresh insights on the ways that European nations have cooperated and integrated in the post-war period and is a great read for academics and general readers alike, writes Jacob van de Beeten. Project Europe: A History. Kiran Klaus Patel. Cambridge University Press. 2020. Deconstructing conventional narratives of...

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Book Review: Territorial Politics and the Party System in Spain: Continuity and Change since the Financial Crisis by Caroline Gray

In Territorial Politics and the Party System in Spain: Continuity and Change since the Financial Crisis, Caroline Gray offers a new analysis of how and why the territorial dimension has contributed to shaping Spain’s politics and party system following the 2008 financial crisis. This in-depth account deserves to be read widely by area studies scholars and students interested in the particularities of Spanish politics and by comparative political scientists looking to situate Spain within...

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