Friday , October 15 2021
Home / Tag Archives: Book Reviews

Tag Archives: Book Reviews

Book Review: In Teachers We Trust: The Finnish Way to World-Class Schools by Pasi Sahlberg and Timothy D. Walker

In their book In Teachers We Trust: The Finnish Way to World-Class Schools, Pasi Sahlberg and Timothy D. Walker draw on seven key principles from the Finnish education system that can help build inclusive and thriving school communities, positioning trust as the key ingredient for educational excellence. The book offers an accessible, relatable and timely contribution to the field of education, particularly teacher professional learning, writes Maja Milatovic.  In Teachers We Trust:...

Read More »

Book Review: The International LGBT Rights Movement: A History by Laura A. Belmonte

In The International LGBT Rights Movement: A History, Laura A. Belmonte describes the twists and turns that have characterised the history of the international LGBT rights movement, focusing primarily on activism and mobilisations in North America and Europe. The book’s key message is that while efforts to achieve equal rights for LGBT people persist, there remains a long road to full equality and dignity, writes Kanav Narayan Sahgal. The International LGBT Rights Movement: A History....

Read More »

Book Review: Dark Academia: How Universities Die by Peter Fleming

In Dark Academia: How Universities Die, Peter Fleming explores the destructive impact of the bureaucratic and neoliberal structures of academia, which have turned universities into toxic workplaces. The book powerfully evokes despair and despondency at the loss of the intellectual environment promised of academics, writes Chelsea Guo, yet she questions whether the traditional academic institution has ever truly been a sanctuary for everyone.  Dark Academia: How Universities Die. Peter...

Read More »

Book Review: The Power of Narrative: Climate Skepticism and the Deconstruction of Science by Raul P. Lejano and Shondel J. Nero

In The Power of Narrative: Climate Skepticism and the Deconstruction of Science, Raul P. Lejano and Shondel J. Nero offer a narrative analysis of climate skepticism, exploring its emergence and transformations as well as its position in the ‘post-truth’ era. This book will help readers to critically understand the social and political construction of public narratives surrounding climate change as well as other contemporary issues, writes Sneha Biswas.  The Power of Narrative: Climate...

Read More »

Book Review: Moldova: A History by Rebecca Haynes

In Moldova: A History, Rebecca Haynes offers a new history of Moldovan statehood, exploring how the identity of the Moldovan nation has developed through its historical relations with neighbouring states and empires over many centuries. Providing detailed explanation of the historical and political development of Moldova, this thorough and accessible work is a useful addition to English-language literature on the topic and will be of particular value to those with no prior knowledge of...

Read More »

Book Review: The Daily Lives of Muslims: Islam and Public Confrontation in Contemporary Europe by Nilüfer Göle

In The Daily Lives of Muslims: Islam and Public Confrontation in Contemporary Europe, Nilüfer Göle explores the everyday experiences of Muslims in a number of European countries. While commending the wide range of different European societies covered and the examination of European Muslim and Jewish experiences, Jennifer Philippa Eggert found some aspects of the book’s treatment of key figures, terms and theological concepts disappointing.  The Daily Lives of Muslims: Islam and Public...

Read More »

Book Review: Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism by Anne Case and Angus Deaton

In Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, Anne Case and Angus Deaton document the rising death rates from suicide, drug overdoses and alcoholic liver disease in the US, exploring what these ‘deaths of despair’ reveal about capitalism and the healthcare system. Making a compelling case for exploring these deaths of despair and their implications, this stimulating and thought-provoking book belongs on the reading list of all of us who are facing difficulties and uncertainties in...

Read More »

Book Review: Power Shift: The Global Political Economy of Energy Transitions by Peter Newell

In Power Shift: The Global Political Economy of Energy Transitions, Peter Newell examines energy transitions at all levels of governance, drawing out the lessons learned from prior energy transitions to unlock an actionable understanding of today’s struggle to decarbonise the global economy. While the book stops short of presenting a detailed comparative analytical framework, researchers can learn a great deal from Newell’s activism, insights and his extensive survey of the existing...

Read More »

Book Review: The Economic History of Colonialism by Leigh Gardner and Tirthankar Roy

In The Economic History of Colonialism, Leigh Gardner and Tirthankar Roy offer a new historical account of the relationship between economic development and colonialism, showing how diverse processes of colonisation impacted on patterns of economic growth. Seeking to understand the roots of growth as well as poverty and inequality in formerly colonised nations as well as the origins of the environmental challenges we are facing in the current century, this book offers a nuanced study...

Read More »

Book Review: Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness by Terese Jonsson

In Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness, Terese Jonsson explores how mainstream feminism continues to be widely defined and theorised through a white lens and therefore continues to neglect race and intersectionality. This well-articulated and accessible book offers a valuable and coherent introduction to those looking to better understand the relationship between white privilege and feminism, writes Sofie Gregersen. Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness. Terese Jonsson. Pluto...

Read More »