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Tag Archives: Brexit

Scotland needs a pragmatic strategy for its EU and global relations

In recent months, the Scottish government has made clear its intention to increase its European and global profile. However, it is limited by the impact of Brexit, its antagonistic relationship with the UK government, and polarisation over its EU and international engagement, writes Anthony Salamone. He argues the government should use its promised Global Affairs Framework to establish a credible and pragmatic strategy which recognises these challenges and articulates a post-Brexit,...

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Uncovering the local factors that helped shape the Brexit referendum

Why was support for Brexit so widely divergent across the UK? Drawing on a new study, José Javier Olivas Osuna, Max Kiefel and Kira Gartzou-Katsouyanni illustrate that while a variety of economic and cultural explanations for the result have been put forward, these processes were shaped at the local level. They find that citizens with similar socio-demographic profiles adopted very different attitudes toward Brexit depending on the local context in which they lived. The 2016 Brexit...

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The iron cage revisited: How Brexit constrains the UK

In recent weeks, the Trade and Cooperation Agreement between the UK and the EU has once again been making headlines. Bob Hancké reports on a recent study which suggests not only that the agreement has made trade in goods between the UK and the EU very difficult, but that it has also severely limited Britain’s ability to conclude free trade agreements with the rest of the world. Taking back control, especially in international trade, was one of the perhaps few tangible benefits that...

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For much of the British electorate, Europe is now the issue that determines party allegiance

Are voters motivated by policy preferences or partisan identities? Bryan Schonfeld and Sam Winter-Levy present findings from a study of how British voters responded to the Conservative Party’s sudden change in Brexit policy following the 2016 EU referendum. They find evidence that voters are sufficiently policy motivated to shift their allegiances if they disagree with their party on important issues. Ever since the 2016 referendum, British voters have been leaving their old parties...

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Dancing in the dark: What Brexit means for UK-EU trade and UK industry

The post-Brexit Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the UK and the EU is nominally a free trade agreement for goods. Bob Hancké, Laurenz Mathei and Artus Galiay examine in more detail what the agreement does and does not mean for trade. They argue the agreement falls some way short of establishing ‘free trade’ and that the combination of Brexit, wider secular societal and industrial trends, and the pandemic are creating a perfect storm for British exporting companies. Five...

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How the EU facilitated contact between the Irish government and the British royal family

In 2011, a state visit by Queen Elizabeth II to Ireland was hailed as a watershed moment for UK-Irish relations. Darren Litter writes that while the event was highly symbolic, the EU had helped facilitate contact between the Irish government and the royals as far back as the 1970s. It is now ten years since Queen Elizabeth II’s historic state visit to Ireland in 2011 – the first visit by a ruling monarch since the Irish state’s formation in 1921. The visit is widely regarded as a...

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Politicisation and international negotiations: Why delivering on Brexit proved impossible for Theresa May

The Brexit negotiations led by Theresa May ultimately ended in failure for both British and European negotiators. Drawing on a new study, Felix Biermann and Stefan Jagdhuber explain why reaching a workable compromise proved impossible. Theresa May’s unfortunate tenure as British Prime Minister was undone by her inability to secure parliamentary support for her EU withdrawal agreement. Boris Johnson subsequently led the UK out of the EU with a harder form of Brexit than many had hoped...

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Brexit was a warning sign for the integration process – the EU must reshape itself as a project for the ‘left behind’

The agreement reached between the UK and the EU in December last year was billed as the final act in the Brexit saga. Yet as Uğur Tekiner writes, there is still much that remains uncertain about the future UK-EU relationship and the impact of Brexit on the EU. The world may be plagued by the Covid-19 pandemic, but it was not long ago that a different issue dominated the headlines across Europe: Brexit. Following the end of trade talks between the United Kingdom and the European Union...

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New EU insolvency rules could underpin business rescue in the COVID-19 aftermath

Corporate bankruptcies are set to rise in the context of COVID-19. EU countries should speed up adoption of recent insolvency reforms and, in addition, offer consistent treatment to restructuring finance. One of the less-remarked consequences of the COVID-19 crisis, the associated lockdowns and the unprecedented collapse in demand experienced by some companies, has been a dramatic fall in business defaults and insolvencies. In a normal year, just under 200,000 insolvency proceedings are...

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Financial services: The Brexit dust begins to settle

The phase of greatest Brexit-related uncertainty for the European financial sector ended on 1 January. Although too early to discern more than the broadest contours of the future landscape, it is increasingly apparent that London will be less dominant than before. The Brexit story has entered a new phase. The United Kingdom’s exit from the European single market on 1 January was orderly in the financial sector, despite significant shifts of liquidity in shares and derivatives, and unlike the...

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