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Tag Archives: Brexit

The UK and the EU: Another two-level game

The prospects for a post-Brexit trade deal between the UK and the EU look increasingly bleak following talks between EU leaders on 15 October. Bob Hancké attempts to make sense of the negotiations. Finally, the gloves are off. French president Macron, a bit more preoccupied with containing a new outbreak of Covid-19 than with Brexit, has turned the tables and told Boris Johnson to ‘go whistle’. If the UK wants a Brexit agreement before the end of the year, it is going to have to accept...

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The future of EU-UK relations (again!)

At the eleventh hour of negotiations, what will the future of the EU-UK relationship look like? By: The Sound of Economics Date: October 13, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance On 15-16 October the European Council will take stock of the implementation of the withdrawal agreement and review the state of the negotiations on the future EU-UK partnership. Leaders will discuss preparatory work for all scenarios after 1 January 2021. The timetable is very tight, with...

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The European Parliament and the post-Brexit trade agreement: How long is needed for scrutiny?

The EU and the UK have yet to reach an agreement on their future relationship, but if an agreement is reached, will it be possible to ratify the deal before the transition period expires at the end of 2020? Nicolai von Ondarza and Dominik Rehbaum look at the role of the European Parliament in previous trade agreements, concluding that a deal will likely have to be done by mid-November at the latest. The negotiations on the future relationship between the EU and the UK are nearing crunch time....

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Disrupting supply chains: Why leaving the Single Market means systemic breakdown

The UK will leave the Single Market at the end of this year, with new rules set to be implemented that will have an important impact on British businesses. Monica Horten writes that these changes have the potential to lead to uncertainties of supply, price hikes and potentially shortages. Prompt action could alleviate the situation, but ignoring it will result in long term damage. When the UK finally quits the Single Market on 1 January, rule changes will come into effect for businesses. With...

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The EU’s Opportunity to Turn Its Markets Toward the Future

Meeting the fiscal demands of COVID-19 will require the European Union to borrow on capital markets more than ever, and for European pension funds and households to look more widely for ways to build their nest eggs safely. The EU should take the challenges of the pandemic and Brexit as a chance to get its financial infrastructure house in order. By: Rebecca Christie Date: July 16, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance This article is based on a version first...

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Are Britain and Europe becoming ‘vassalised’?

The term ‘vassal state’ has been frequently used by those warning against a post-Brexit relationship that leaves the UK obliged to adopt EU rules or subject to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Yet as Glyn Morgan writes, there is a paradox in the use of the term given the EU’s power on the international stage is increasingly constrained by China and the United States. The EU is now facing up to the prospect that it is less imperialist than imperialised: vassals, in short, of...

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Start Up Nation from the Left

Share the post "Start Up Nation from the Left" Ceci est le second texte dans notre échange sur Slow Démocratie, par David Djaïz (Editions Allary, 2019).  Few will remember the “Slow Science” movement. In 2011, a group of academics launched a call in The Atlantic for a decelerated research ethic. “We need time to think and we do need time to digest,” their manifesto claimed, including “time to misunderstand each other, especially when fostering lost dialogue between...

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One rule to ring them all? Europe’s financial markets after Brexit

By: The Sound of Economics Date: June 26, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance The response to COVID crisis necessitates a lot of cash. So will the upcoming green transition. But with Brexit, Europe lost its easy and practical access to the world’s largest financial market. So is today the right time to create a European capital markets union, with only one rule to ring them all; one rule to bind all 27 capital markets in the EU? Episode guests:Rebecca Christie,...

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Is Twitter a Menace?

Social media is decried as the denizen of fake news and slander.  How did social media happen and does it have a problem?Twitter was founded in March 2006.  Amongst its first users were large media chains.  The BBC News was one of the first to publicise Twitter, joining in Jan 2007.  The joining dates of other big media were CNN Feb 2007, New York Times March 2007, NBC News March 2008, Daily Express Dec 2008, ITV News Feb 2009, Guardian Nov 2009, Daily Mail Feb 2010.  These established media...

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How will COVID-19 impact Brexit? The collision of two giant policy imperatives

The United Kingdom left the European Union on Jan. 31, 2020. Now, the U.K. must decide whether and how to extend the transition period, currently set to expire at the end of 2020. By: Rebecca Christie Date: May 19, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance The United Kingdom left the European Union on Jan. 31, 2020, only 10 months after its initially scheduled departure. That is quite speedy for a major geopolitical shift. As with any tectonic adjustment, the...

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