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Tag Archives: COVID-19

Forgotten key workers: Why migrant domestic carers deserve greater support

The Covid-19 pandemic has drawn attention to the role of key workers in providing essential services. Michael Leiblfinger and Veronika Prieler examine the case of migrant domestic carers, who perform a vital service in many European countries. They argue that while there has been a great deal of discussion about the service live-in carers provide, there has been relatively little done to improve their working conditions. The Covid-19 pandemic highlighted some employees as critical or...

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A K-shaped recovery and the role of fiscal policy

The spine of the letter represents the fall in activity at the start of the pandemic. Then there is a split, which leads to the two ‘arms’ that capture the different directions taken by economic activity in different sectors. By: Maria Demertzis Date: March 2, 2021 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance This opinion piece was originally published in the Money Review Section of Kathimerini and is forthcoming in El Economista. The shape of the post-pandemic economic...

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COVID-19 credit-support programmes in Europe’s five largest economies

This paper assesses COVID-19 credit-support programmes in five of the largest European economies, and examines how countries have dealt with trade-offs raised by the programmes. In 2020, European governments mitigated the economic impact of COVID-19 lockdowns and other pandemic-fighting programmes through a host of initiatives. These included efforts to support credit, such as guarantees for bank loans, particularly to small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). We present and analyse...

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Asset bubbles won’t help our post-pandemic recovery

An unintended consequence of the virus has been ‘one of the wildest bull markets in recent economic history’ but a worsening of income distribution will have a negative impact further down the line. Covid-19 will be remembered as the worst global economic shock in recent history but, compared to the most similar one, the Great Depression of 1929, its consequences on asset prices have been radically different. In fact, the Great Depression started with an implosion of equity prices while the...

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La dette : une obsession prématurée

Ce qui est malsain, avec la proposition d’annuler la dette, c’est le déni de réalité consistant à affirmer que l’Etat peut effacer une partie de ses engagements sans que cela ne coûte à personne. By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Date: February 22, 2021 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance This opinion piece was originally published in Le Monde. En arrivant à la Maison Blanche, Joe Biden a trouvé une dette publique de 27.000 milliards de dollars et un déficit public de 3600...

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Incorporating complexity into policy learning: The case of Covid-19 in Europe

Across the three waves of the Covid-19 pandemic that hit European countries in the space of twelve months, outcome indicators for Covid-19 cases and deaths diverged, as did policy responses. Linda Hantrais and Susanne MacGregor examine evidence about what societies and their institutions could have learnt from each other and from their own experiences during successive waves of the pandemic. They ask whether policy learning seemed to be more effective in some societies than in others,...

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Biden’s Covid-19 Plan: A Road Towards Universal Basic Income?

Share the post "Biden’s Covid-19 Plan: A Road Towards Universal Basic Income?" Has Covid-19 made an Andrew Yang out of Joe Biden? During the 2020 Democratic primary, Yang’s promise of a monthly $1,000 “Freedom Dividend”—a form of Universal Basic Income (or UBI)—was not enough to carry the entrepreneur to the White House. But President Biden’s plan to fight the coronavirus and its economic fallout includes yet another round of direct payments, the third in only a year....

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The EU’s vaccine debacle has revealed its limitations as a strategic actor

The European Commission has faced intense criticism over the slow rollout of Covid-19 vaccination programmes in EU states. Angelos Chryssogelos assesses what the affair tells us about the EU’s aspirations to become an effective strategic actor. The vaccine crisis, where the EU found itself in a public feud with a pharmaceutical company and facing a diplomatic emergency with the UK over vaccine export controls to Northern Ireland, has raised obvious questions about the EU’s internal...

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So long credit support?

COVID-19 has caused unprecedented disruption to business. Since the first lockdowns, governments have used credit support programmes as the main instrument to mitigate the liquidity shock businesses have been facing. Have the programmes worked? Bruegel Director Guntram Wolff is joined by Bruegel’s very own Julia Anderson, Francesco Papadia and Nicolas Véron to talk about their research into credit support programmes in Europe’s five largest economies. They  share their findings with...

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Next Generation EU: How the EU’s Covid-19 Recovery Fund should be implemented

How can the resources made available through the EU’s Covid-19 Recovery Fund be used most effectively? Drawing on a new study, Riccardo Crescenzi, Mara Giua and Giulia Sonzogno write that it will be necessary for national governments to mobilise resources through the involvement of relevant stakeholders. To reduce the probability of implementation delays, projects should bypass regional governments in those states where delays are more likely, with citizens given direct involvement in...

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