Sunday , February 23 2020
Home / Tag Archives: David Cameron

Tag Archives: David Cameron

The David Cameron memoirs: No apology, no atonement, no courage

In a new book, David Cameron details his time as UK Prime Minister and his reaction to losing the country’s referendum on EU membership. George Kassimeris writes that future historians are unlikely to be any kinder to Cameron than today’s political commentators, and his unwillingness to offer an apology for the turbulence that followed the referendum will do little to restore his reputation. It is now easy to forget, with everything that has gone on over the last three years, that David...

Read More »

Anti-corruption after Brexit: What is left of David Cameron’s legacy?

Share this:David Cameron’s government frequently emphasised the need to tackle corruption, both within the UK and abroad. Daniel Hough assesses how this picture is likely to change following Britain’s decision to leave the EU and the appointment of Theresa May as Prime Minister. He writes that with Brexit posing a number of challenges for May’s government, there is a danger that the issue of tackling corruption slips off the political agenda. “The future” as the unfortunate wordsmith Dan...

Read More »

The London Anti-Corruption Summit: one good day is not enough

Issues of financial secrecy took centre-stage at the anti-corruption summit in London on 12 May. Sam Power reviews the progress made, arguing that the summit was a small step in the right direction, but by no means the dawn of a new era. With the limelight on the anti-corruption talks already fading away, the summit’s success will ultimately depend on the process for translating reforms into action. Representatives from over 40 countries, from Argentina, to Georgia to the United States, met...

Read More »

Panama Papers: this is a chance to fix a long broken system

After a year of cross border investigations, a big leak of documents belonging to the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca has started to be released in international media. The documents lay bare cases of tax evasion and money laundering, implicating a number of prominent personalities and world leaders. Daniel Hough assesses the importance of the inquiry and argues that this scandal should be seized as an opportunity for a complete overhaul of a long broken system.  In every crisis there...

Read More »

Yanis Varoufakis: “The UK should stay in the EU to fight tooth and nail against the EU’s anti-democratic institutions”

In an interview with EUROPP’s editor Stuart Brown, former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis discusses the launch of his new ‘Democracy in Europe’ movement (DiEM25), the UK’s upcoming referendum on EU membership, and why a surge of democracy is needed to prevent the EU from sliding toward disintegration. You have just launched a new political movement, DiEM25, which has the aim of democratising Europe. Your manifesto states that ‘the EU will either be democratised or it will...

Read More »

The UK’s renegotiation proposal: A good compromise, but much needs to be done to convince voters

A draft proposal for the UK’s renegotiation of its EU membership was published on 2 February. Benjamin Leruth assesses whether the proposal meets the goals set out in David Cameron’s letter to Donald Tusk in November. He writes that while in principle the key aims set out by Cameron have been met, there remains a long way to go before a final deal can be secured with all of the EU’s member states. On 2 February, Donald Tusk unveiled a draft proposal for a new settlement for the United...

Read More »

A double bind: Cameron urges non-discrimination in one policy area, while wanting to discriminate in another

The UK government has entered the final stages of its negotiations with the EU. The issues of immigration control and the refugee crisis seem to overshadow the debate. Yet, as Waltraud Schelkle points out, the “Dear Donald — Yours David” letter of Prime Minister Cameron to European Council President Tusk reveals that the other leading issue is financial integration in a European Union with “effectively two sorts of members”, those in the Eurozone and those outside. Looking at immigration...

Read More »

If bombing the Middle East was the way to peace, it would be the most peaceful place on Earth

On Wednesday 2 December, British MPs voted to deploy bomb attacks against ISIS/Daesh strongholds in Syria, in response to their attack on Paris earlier this month. Here, Sean Swan argues that this is misguided; despite the understandable yearning to be seen to ‘do something’, the Middle East has been bombed by the West before without achieving the desired results, and there is nothing to suggest this time would be different.  Syria in the pre-war days (Christophe, CC BY 2.0) Mr Cameron...

Read More »

Britain’s risky euro-out strategy

In his letter to Donald Tusk, David Cameron stressed the importance of Eurozone and non-Eurozone members being on an equal footing. Iain Begg argues that this request is problematic. Among the issues raised, he writes that it would be a mistake to think that the interests of the nine member states that are out of the Eurozone are closely aligned and that the numerical balance will remain the same in the long term. As a consequence, the UK may find that support from the non-euro countries is...

Read More »

David Cameron’s proposal to give national parliaments a ‘red card’ over EU laws is deeply flawed

David Cameron has sent a letter to the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, outlining the key elements that he will seek in a renegotiation of the UK’s EU membership. As Valentin Kreilinger writes, one of Cameron’s demands is to strengthen the role of national parliaments in the EU’s legislative process, with the provision of a so called ‘red card’ mechanism that would allow groups of parliaments to effectively veto new proposals. He argues that this system would be likely to...

Read More »