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Tag Archives: elections

Boris Johnson, Brexit, and the decline of public standards

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has faced calls for his resignation over the holding of parties at Number 10 Downing Street during lockdown. Andrew Ryder argues the scandal runs much deeper than the work culture at the heart of government or Boris Johnson’s personal failings. It is emblematic of a decline in public standards that has sharply escalated since the Brexit referendum. Public standards or what can be termed the principles of public life are: selflessness, integrity,...

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Le Régalien et Le Sacre

Share the post "Le Régalien et Le Sacre" Valérie Pécresse reportedly intends to devote the beginning of her campaign to “le régalien“: “Il ne faut pas lâcher cette thématique, au moins jusqu’à fin janvier, insiste le député Eric Pauget. Son électorat a de fortes attentes sur le régalien, et cela reste un des points de faiblesse de Macron.” The dictionary tells us what this means: “Qui concerne, qui appartient en propre au roi, au souverain.” Poor Emmanuel Macron: his...

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Who Is Voting for Pécresse?

Share the post "Who Is Voting for Pécresse?" A new poll sheds light on the Pécresse electorate. It is essentially the Fillon electorate–older, more likely to be retired, more Catholic, and wealthier than the average voter–augmented by a post-primary influx of somewhat younger voters somewhat less favorable to cutting state sector employment and somewhat more favorable to redistribution of income (for numbers, see the article at the link). It is a somewhat unstable...

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Taubira “Envisages” a Presidential Run

Share the post "Taubira “Envisages” a Presidential Run" Just what the left needs: another presidential candidate. “Squabble among yourselves; leave me out of it,” said Jean-Luc Mélenchon. One can understand his frustration. Meanwhile, the Macroniste camp called attention to the fact that Taubira is not merely an icon, the eloquent justice minister responsible for passing the Mariage pour Tous law; she also has a less well-known history as a political operator: in 1994...

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Sustaining democracy: The moral burden of citizenship

When debates become polarised, it can be tempting to treat political opponents as obstacles rather than fellow citizens. Yet as Robert B. Talisse explains, this refusal to engage with the other side not only carries negative implications for democracy, but also produces ineffective, conformist coalitions that are incapable of realising their political aims. If citizens want to achieve their goals in a democracy, they must find a way to work with their opponents. Democracy isn’t easy....

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New Polls Indicate Yet Another New Race

Share the post "New Polls Indicate Yet Another New Race" As I predicted in my previous post, Valérie Pécresse has obtained a significant “post-convention bounce,” while Éric Zemmour has slumped. A new IFOP poll has Macron at 25% and Pécresse even with Le Pen at 17, while Zemmour has fallen to 13 and Mélenchon to 9. Jadot is at 6 and Hidalgo at 5. In the second round, IFOP has Macron beating Pécresse by only 52 to 48, compared with 56 to 44 against Le Pen and 63 to 37...

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The Second Movement of La Symphonie Zemmour

Share the post "The Second Movement of La Symphonie Zemmour" Anyone who follows French presidential elections knows that there is a regular pattern to insurgent candidacies. The first movement is triumphal and allegro. The crescendos build as the novel candidate is borne aloft on a whirlwind of publicity. Barriers fall as if made of gossamer. But then, just as suddenly as it began, the music slows and turns somber. The establishment regroups. The barriers suddenly...

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The Republican Right Vanishes

Share the post "The Republican Right Vanishes" Renaud Muselier, the president of PACA, has quit Les Républicains. The reason: he believes that the party he helped to found has erased the line that used to divide it from the far right. His ire is directed in particular at Eric Ciotti, his longtime rival in the PACA region. Interestingly, Muselier invokes his family’s history of resistance to fascism as justification for his departure: « Mon grand-père a donné la croix de...

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Third time’s the charm? Bulgaria’s November elections and the elusive quest for a parliamentary majority

Bulgaria has held three parliamentary elections in 2021, with the latest vote taking place on 14 November alongside the first round of the country’s presidential election. In the second round of the presidential vote, held on 21 November, incumbent President Rumen Radev was re-elected for another five-year term. Kjell Engelbrekt and Petia Kostadinova write that amid widespread frustration with the country’s political leaders, there is now a mandate for a new government to implement...

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Who votes for the populist radical right in Portugal and Spain?

In 2019, the radical right parties Chega and Vox made headlines by winning representation in the national parliaments of Portugal and Spain. Drawing on new research, Lea Heyne and Luca Manucci shed light on the voters who backed the two parties. Until recently, populist radical right parties were widely assumed to be fringe actors in Portuguese and Spanish politics. This ‘Iberian exceptionalism’ was rooted in the idea that such parties would be unable to break from the stigma...

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