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Tag Archives: Inequality

What the latest Household Finance and Consumption Survey tells us about wealth inequality in Europe

Questions of inequality and distribution are likely to become increasingly important in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Franziska Disslbacher and Patrick Mokre draw on the latest Household Finance and Consumption Survey, released in March, to shed some light on current trends in European wealth inequality. Amidst the Covid crisis, some news is drowning in the headlines. For example, many almost missed the recent publication of the new Household Finance and Consumption Survey (HFCS) by the...

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Does rising economic inequality create a representation gap between rich and poor? Evidence from Europe and the United States

Economically powerful individuals are assumed to have greater capacity to influence politics than those with lower incomes. This might imply that as economic inequality increases, we should see a growing representation gap between rich and poor. Yet as Derek A. Epp and Enrico Borghetto explain, previous research has produced a mixed picture, with lobbyists that have the most financial backing often failing to secure policy victories. Drawing on a new study, they suggest the influence of...

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COVID-19: The self-employed are hardest hit and least supported

Self-employed workers are hardest-hit by COVID-19 lockdowns. Yet they often receive less government support than salaried employees. Is the disparity justified? By: Julia Anderson Date: April 8, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Government support packages to help workers endure the disruptions caused by COVID-19 are ostensibly generous but often discriminatory. In many countries, self-employed workers receive less support than salaried employees. In the...

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How COVID-19 is laying bare inequality

COVID-19 is laying bare socio-economic inequalities and could exacerbate them in the near future. The virus is a risk factor particularly for those at the lower end of the income distribution, who are vulnerable to the interaction of the shock with income, socio-economic and urban inequalities. The COVID-19 crisis shows how the more vulnerable socio-economic groups suffer from a greater risk of financial exposure, and also from greater health risks, and worse housing conditions during the...

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Education and Property for All: Thomas Piketty on Capital and Ideology

Share the post "Education and Property for All: Thomas Piketty on Capital and Ideology" With the publication of Capital in the Twenty-First Century in 2013, Thomas Piketty became perhaps the world’s best-known chronicler and theorist of global inequality. His latest book, Capital and Ideology, pushes the conversation on inequality a step further, examining the ideologies that justify inequality across history, and laying out a platform for what Piketty calls a...

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Thomas Piketty: “The current economic system is not working when it comes to solving inequality”

Following a recent event at LSE, Thomas Piketty took questions from LSE staff, students and members of the public on inequality and his latest book, Capital and Ideology. Will we see a dramatic shift in inequality in the UK following Brexit? I think, if anything, Brexit will exacerbate the trend toward rising inequality. This is because it will tend to exacerbate things like tax competition and social competition. I think there will be an attempt by the current British government at least to...

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Revue de Press: February 2

Share the post "Revue de Press: February 2" Whatever you believe, you’re probably wrong about inequality. At least that’s what Jonathan Rothwell thinks. In an article for Foreign Policy, he argues that globalization and corporations are not to blame for the astronomical levels of inequality in the United States. Nor is inequality the natural product of innovation and competition. Rather, inequality is the result of unequal political power. Specifically, high-paying...

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“Why Great Revolutions Will Become Rare”

Share the post "“Why Great Revolutions Will Become Rare”" Judging by the various mass protest movements that have erupted around the world in recent years (see the rest of our series on global revolt here), there have been no shortage of potential triggers for something similar in the United States. One common reason for these uprisings have been government policies imposing increased costs on basic needs of many working- and middle-class people: even modest raises in...

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Fear of the Ivory Tower

Share the post "Fear of the Ivory Tower" This is a commentary in our special forum on the Academy and Democracy, jointly hosted with the Journal of the History of Ideas Blog. We asked contributors whether higher education presupposes a hierarchy. In brief, how has higher education destabilized elites and challenged aristocracies? How has it sustained them? Each author approaches our prompt from a historical perspective, applied across different academic fields, regions,...

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Manufacturing employment, international trade, and China

The decline in manufacturing employment is often seen as a major reason for rising inequality, social tensions, and the slump of entire communities. With the rise of national populists and protectionists in recent years, the issue has become even more prominent.The objective of this paper is to better understand the evolution of manufacturing employment across the world. Manufacturing value added has grown rapidly since 2000, at least matching world GDP growth, even after the global financial...

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