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Tag Archives: JEPP

How EU external energy policy has become ‘supranationalised’ – and what this means for European integration

Since the beginning of European integration, EU member states have been reluctant to share competences over their external energy relations. Against this backdrop, the new requirement to have bilateral energy agreements assessed by the Commission implies a surprising expansion of supranational powers in energy diplomacy. Philipp Thaler and Vija Pakalkaite take a closer look at this development and find that it is closely linked to a novel instrument for compliance governance. As peculiar as...

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Does rising economic inequality create a representation gap between rich and poor? Evidence from Europe and the United States

Economically powerful individuals are assumed to have greater capacity to influence politics than those with lower incomes. This might imply that as economic inequality increases, we should see a growing representation gap between rich and poor. Yet as Derek A. Epp and Enrico Borghetto explain, previous research has produced a mixed picture, with lobbyists that have the most financial backing often failing to secure policy victories. Drawing on a new study, they suggest the influence of...

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An institutional mismatch: Why ‘taking back control’ proved so appealing in the Brexit debate

‘Taking back control’ was a key element of the Leave campaign’s case for Brexit, but why did the principle find such resonance among the British public? Drawing on a new study, Susanne K Schmidt writes that it is important to recognise some core features of the UK polity that contrast with the EU’s political system. These institutional differences formed the foundations for Britain’s decision to leave. The political process leading to the Leave vote in the UK’s EU referendum was fraught with...

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Brexit: Simply an omnishambles or a major policy fiasco?

The UK’s referendum on EU membership in 2016 set off a chain of political events that can best be described as an ‘omnishambles’. But how did the country end up at this point, and what explains the approach pursued to implement Brexit following the result? Jeremy Richardson and Berthold Rittberger present their own overview of the Brexit saga, distinguishing between the idiosyncratic processes and the more general trends that led to the referendum and its aftermath. Political satire and the...

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How the Basel Accord’s dependence on external institutions aggravated the 2008 financial crisis

Deficiencies in the Basel II accord, which set recommendations on banking regulation, have been highlighted as one of the main causes of the global financial crisis that emerged in 2008. Manuel Becker and Simon Linder explain that a particularly problematic feature was the accord’s reliance on so called ‘regulatory import’, where regulators incorporate governance from an external forum into their own regulations, thus making their own performance dependent on external institutions. The weak...

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How populist radical right parties have eroded the EU’s human rights agenda in the Mediterranean

It is often assumed that populist radical right parties will support disengaging from the European Union by default. Adrià Rivera Escartin writes that although many of these parties do support disengaging from the EU, there is the potential for a different approach to be adopted in future which might be termed ‘informal and illiberal Europeanisation’. Italy’s capacity to shape EU relations with Tunisia and Hungary’s efforts to influence the EU’s relations with Egypt offer two recent examples...

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How war helped facilitate the introduction of unemployment insurance in the West

The question of whether governments should provide financial assistance to the unemployed has proven to be one of the most heated issues in modern politics. Yet given the opposition such schemes have faced throughout history, what prompted states to introduce them? Drawing on a new study, Herbert Obinger and Carina Schmitt highlight the crucial impact the West’s experience with war during the 20th century had in motivating states to adopt unemployment insurance systems. Unemployment insurance...

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Is the liberal international order in a state of terminal decline?

The disengagement of the United States from multilateral cooperation and a rise in ‘illiberal’ politics across the globe have led many observers to conclude the liberal international order is in a state of decline. Drawing on a new study, Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni and Stephanie C. Hofmann argue that what we may be witnessing is not necessarily the breakdown of the existing order, but rather its transformation into a broader, more inclusive system of global governance, reflecting the need to...

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Understanding EU trade policy in the twenty-first century

The EU has negotiated numerous bilateral trade agreements with countries around the world during the last two decades. As we move into 2020, Patrick Leblond and Crina Viju-Miljusevic take stock of the changes that have occurred in EU trade policy in the twenty-first century and highlight some key future research agendas. Over the last 20 years, the European Union (EU) has conducted an active trade policy, negotiating a multitude of bilateral trade agreements and being strongly involved in...

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Why Europe’s immigration policies are not converging

Are immigration policies in European countries converging? Or do some countries remain more open to immigrants than others? Drawing on a new study, Erica Consterdine and James Hampshire write that while it might be expected that globalisation would have encouraged European states to adopt similar immigration policies, there is little sign this has occurred. There is some evidence that policies reflect variations in capitalism across Europe, but the main driver of immigration policy continues...

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