Friday , May 7 2021
Home / Tag Archives: JEPP Series

Tag Archives: JEPP Series

Politicisation and rebordering: How the discourse surrounding EU enlargement has changed in European parliaments since 2004

There is little question the EU’s enlargement process has stalled since the ‘big bang’ enlargement of 2004, but how has the discourse surrounding enlargement changed in European parliaments during this period? Drawing on a new study, Marie-Eve Bélanger and Frank Schimmelfennig find that enlargement discourse in European parliaments was significantly more restrictive during the 2010s, with the enlargement process losing salience and becoming increasingly culturally contested. European...

Read More »

How the 2015 migration crisis shaped the bordering preferences of EU citizens

In 2015, EU countries struggled to cope with a sharp increase in the number of migrants and refugees entering Europe. But how did the crisis affect public opinion toward free movement within the EU? Drawing on a new study, Philipp Lutz finds that contrary to expectations, the crisis did not result in citizens turning away from free movement. Rather, there has been an increase in support for stronger external controls on immigration from outside the EU. Surging refugee arrivals in 2015...

Read More »

Bridge policies and welfare politics: How the preferences of voters feed into social policymaking

How do parties integrate the views of voters into their policy platforms? Drawing on a new study of social policy in seven European countries, Michael Pinggera explains that parties increasingly focus on ‘bridge policies’ – policies that are popular among both their support base and the general electorate. The role of parties in a functioning democracy is to represent citizens’ policy preferences. This includes preferences on social policies such as pensions, education, and...

Read More »

How participatory regulation is changing the nature of policymaking

Regulators are often shielded from political pressures, with decisions made on the basis of technical expertise rather than public opinion. Yet as Hanan Haber and Eva Heims explain, recent years have seen a growing trend for ‘participatory regulation’ across Europe, where citizens actively participate in the decision-making process. Drawing on a new study, they argue we are increasingly seeing a move away from regulation based on expertise to regulatory decisions that try to capture a...

Read More »

How regulatory agencies use stakeholder consultations to craft their reputation

It is common for regulatory agencies to carry out consultations with relevant stakeholders. However, little is known about what agencies actually do with the information they receive during these consultations. Drawing on a new study, Simon Fink and Eva Ruffing shed some light on the process, illustrating how consultations are used by agencies as a tool to manage their reputation with stakeholders and the wider public. Stakeholder consultations have become a standard procedure in many...

Read More »

Seeing the unseen: Uncovering networks of informal coordination among interest groups

Interest groups interact with one another and frequently coordinate their activities, but much of this communication takes place behind closed doors. Drawing on a new study, Stefano Pagliari and Kevin L Young present a novel approach for uncovering networks of interest groups by using ‘text reuse’ analysis. Everybody knows that interest groups talk to one another and that they sometimes coordinate their actions in ways seeking to maximise their ultimate goals of shaping policy. For...

Read More »

How the Dieselgate scandal helped bring American-style legal conflict resolution to Europe

In 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States uncovered a software modification implemented by Volkswagen that was capable of distorting the results of emissions tests of diesel engines. Drawing on a new study, Katharina van Elten and Britta Rehder explain what the accompanying scandal – dubbed ‘Dieselgate’ – has meant for legal conflict resolution in Europe. The Dieselgate emissions scandal is one of the largest and most far-reaching industrial scandals of the...

Read More »

Why public consultations on EU regulations may come too late to make a difference

Public consultations are often held when EU institutions draft new regulations. Yet as Rik Joosen explains, the involvement of interest groups at earlier stages of the process may limit the influence of these public consultations on the rules that are agreed. EU institutions are increasingly developing ways to engage with societal interests during their policymaking. One way interested actors can provide input is through public consultations. In a recent study based on two novel...

Read More »

How European integration breaks the link between demand for social spending and its supply

How does European integration affect the welfare state? Drawing on a new study, Tobias Tober highlights two conflicting effects that the integration process generates in relation to welfare spending. While economic integration increases popular demand for social spending, political integration decreases its supply, effectively breaking the link between social policy preferences and social policy output. For decades, a prominent line of critique has held that the European integration...

Read More »

How populism emerged from the shadow of neoliberalism in Central and Eastern Europe

Hungary and Poland have pursued a notably ‘populist’ approach to the economy in recent years, which has begun to spread to other countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Mitchell A. Orenstein and Bojan Bugarič argue that Central and Eastern European states’ dependence on foreign capital initially constrained them to follow neoliberal economic policies following their democratic transition. After the global financial crisis, populist parties began to break from this consensus, embracing...

Read More »