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Tag Archives: Latest Research

Why are people with lower levels of education less likely to participate in citizens’ initiatives?

Previous research suggests that people with lower levels of education are underrepresented in citizens’ initiatives. Drawing on new research in the Netherlands, Vivian Visser, Willem de Koster and Jeroen van der Waal show that ‘feelings of entitlement’ and a ‘taste for politics’ are crucial for understanding the non-participation of these citizens. In recent decades, governments across Europe have experimented with increasing opportunities for citizen participation, deliberation and...

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How gender barriers affect the careers of women in government

Debates about gender equality in politics often focus on the number of women elected to parliament or the number of women who hold positions in government. Yet as Corinna Kroeber and Joanna Hüffelmann explain, these debates often overlook the more subtle impact that gender barriers can have on women’s political careers. Drawing on a new study, they show that women in government are often obliged to hold junior roles for longer than their male colleagues before gaining prestigious...

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Book Review: Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism by Anne Case and Angus Deaton

In Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, Anne Case and Angus Deaton document the rising death rates from suicide, drug overdoses and alcoholic liver disease in the US, exploring what these ‘deaths of despair’ reveal about capitalism and the healthcare system. Making a compelling case for exploring these deaths of despair and their implications, this stimulating and thought-provoking book belongs on the reading list of all of us who are facing difficulties and uncertainties in...

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Book Review: Power Shift: The Global Political Economy of Energy Transitions by Peter Newell

In Power Shift: The Global Political Economy of Energy Transitions, Peter Newell examines energy transitions at all levels of governance, drawing out the lessons learned from prior energy transitions to unlock an actionable understanding of today’s struggle to decarbonise the global economy. While the book stops short of presenting a detailed comparative analytical framework, researchers can learn a great deal from Newell’s activism, insights and his extensive survey of the existing...

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The end of capitalism

What would a world beyond capitalism look like? Simon Glendinning looks for answers in the work of the Italian economist Piero Sraffa. In 2014 Nuno Martins, a young political economist from the Universidade Católica Portuguesa, published a paper in the Review of Political Economy that brought to light a very brief but fascinating text on the history of capitalism by the Italian economist Piero Sraffa, a little text that Martins had found among Sraffa’s papers at the Wren Library,...

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The rise of citizen social science raises more questions about social science than it answers

Citizen social science, whereby members of the public participate in the investigation and analysis of social phenomena, is becoming an increasingly common research method, especially to address localised social issues. Alexandra Albert writes that whilst citizen social science presents certain opportunities, the potential of citizen social science to realign the power dynamics and relationships between researcher and researched remains to be realised. Citizen social science (CSS)...

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Book Review: Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness by Terese Jonsson

In Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness, Terese Jonsson explores how mainstream feminism continues to be widely defined and theorised through a white lens and therefore continues to neglect race and intersectionality. This well-articulated and accessible book offers a valuable and coherent introduction to those looking to better understand the relationship between white privilege and feminism, writes Sofie Gregersen. Innocent Subjects: Feminism and Whiteness. Terese Jonsson. Pluto...

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Why history matters for gender balance in political representation

Why does the gender balance among politicians vary so substantially across different locations? Drawing on a new study, Moa Frödin Gruneau illustrates that the historical persistence of traditional family structures has a clear relationship with the number of women in politics today. Despite numerous attempts over the years to increase the share of women among politicians, politics more often than not remains a man’s game. But why is the gender imbalance in political assemblies across...

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Book Review: The Pay Off: How Changing the Way We Pay Changes Everything by Gottfried Leibbrandt and Natasha de Terán

In The Pay Off: How Changing the Way We Pay Changes Everything, Gottfried Leibbrandt and Natasha de Terán offer a new account of the history and workings of payments infrastructures, showing how the movement of money is crucial to understanding financial power today. Offering careful and accessible insight into the basics of payments and intelligent analysis of the Fintech boom, this book is an essential first step for all those looking to understand the possible future of the payments...

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Noncompliance risk and asymmetric power: Explaining the views of EU member states on economic governance reforms

The design of the EU’s system of economic governance has caused frequent disagreements between member states. Drawing on a new study, Fabio Franchino and Camilla Mariotto demonstrate how the risks posed to member states from noncompliance and the distribution of bargaining power in the Council help explain the stances governments have taken on economic governance reforms. On 21 July 2010, Wolfgang Schäuble, the German Minister of Finance, and Christine Lagarde, the French Minister of...

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