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Tag Archives: Latest Research

Book Review: How Ten Global Cities Take On Homelessness: Innovations That Work

In How Ten Global Cities Take On Homelessness: Innovations That Work, Linda Gibbs, Jay Bainbridge, Muzzy Rosenblatt and Tamiru Mammo explore some of the key challenges faced by urban spaces in tackling homelessness and outline the successes of ten global cities when it comes to addressing its causes and consequences. This book is a valuable resource that not only identifies the multiple governance and practical issues involved in solving homelessness, but also provides specific...

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Bankers and populists: Understanding the rise of ‘managerial developmentalism’ in Poland

The resignation of Zbigniew Jagiełło as the CEO of Poland’s largest bank has raised questions about political interference in the country’s financial sector. Marek Naczyk writes that while most of this discussion has focused on the actions of the current Law and Justice government, it is equally important to understand the role that bankers have played in shaping Polish economic policy. On 7 June, Zbigniew Jagiełło, the CEO of Poland’s largest bank, the state-owned PKO Bank Polski,...

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Electoral systems help explain why left-wing governments (sometimes) tax the poor

Using novel historical data, Per F. Andersson demonstrates that left-wing governments tax more regressively in proportional representation systems and more progressively in majoritarian ones. He illustrates how political risk shapes the strategies of key actors and helps explain the divergence in tax policy using the examples of Swedish and British tax policy after 1945.  We like to believe that our political choices matter, that it makes a difference whether the government is run by...

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Book Review: The Crowdsourced Panopticon: Conformity and Control on Social Media by Jeremy Weissman

In The Crowdsourced Panopticon: Conformity and Control on Social Media, Jeremy Weissman explores the role of ‘peer-to-peer’ surveillance through social media and how this is increasingly shaping our behaviour. This is a welcome addition to the scholarly work on surveillance and privacy, writes Matt Bluemink, with a clear, approachable writing style and a wealth of empirical examples.  The Crowdsourced Panopticon: Conformity and Control on Social Media. Jeremy Weissman. Rowman and...

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Fears of rising inflation are much ado about nothing

Inflation fears have raised their head again. While central banks are keeping money loose, many observers are warning that Covid-19 induced supply and demand shocks have produced upward price pressures for the first time in three decades. Bob Hancké takes a(nother) critical look at the data and the arguments. The chorus is swelling, like in a Verdi opera. Inflation has now officially been declared public enemy number one (well, number two, after the Delta variant). Even usually...

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Book Review: Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics by Joyce P. Jacobsen

In Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics, Joyce P. Jacobsen provides an overview of feminist economics, exploring how various areas of economics intersect with feminism. Full of rich references, this book is a treasure trove for those embarking on ‘doing’ feminist economics, showing how it can challenge the prevailing dogmas of mainstream economics with multiple approaches, writes Rajshree Bedamatta. Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics. Joyce P. Jacobsen. Edward Elgar...

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Small towns and cities must be given a greater voice in efforts to increase urban inclusion

A number of EU initiatives have been implemented to help make Europe’s urban areas more inclusive spaces for the people who live in them. Yet as Claudio Tocchi, Luciano Scagliotti and Licia Cianetti explain, the bulk of attention has so far focused on large cities. They argue that if the EU is serious about improving inclusion, it must better integrate the voices of small and midsize towns and cities. The growing political, economic, and social distance between metropolitan areas and...

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Book Review: Hate in the Homeland: The New Global Far Right by Cynthia Miller-Idriss

In Hate in the Homeland: The New Global Far Right, Cynthia Miller-Idriss explores the places where the far right recruit young people in communities across the US and around the world. From university campuses and Mixed Martial Arts gyms to clothing stores, online forums and YouTube lifestyle channels, the book examines the physical and virtual spaces in which hate is cultivated and young people are mobilised to join violent hate groups. Katherine Williams recommends this accessible...

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Are experts back in fashion? Four scenarios concerning the contestation of expertise in the European Union

There has been substantial political debate over the last decade about the role of experts in policymaking. But how are these trends likely to develop in future? Drawing on a new edited volume, Vigjilenca Abazi, Johan Adriaensen and Thomas Christiansen set out four distinct scenarios concerning the future role of expertise in policymaking within the EU. The Covid-19 pandemic has once more brought the role of experts in policymaking to the centre of attention. Instead of a general...

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Book Review: The Filing Cabinet: A Vertical History of Information by Craig Robertson

In The Filing Cabinet: A Vertical History of Information, Craig Robertson presents a history of the storage and circulation of documents in early-twentieth-century US offices, showing how the filing cabinet reconfigured office architecture, working conditions and the very definition of information. Revealing the unspooling consequences of the adoption of the filing cabinet by US business, this enjoyable and well-presented book will particularly appeal to researchers exploring media...

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