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Tag Archives: LSE Comment

Why far right party success is about alliances between voters with different immigration grievances, and not just about culture

Support for the far right is often explained with reference to a ‘cultural backlash’ against cosmopolitanism, globalisation and immigration. Drawing on a new study, Daphne Halikiopoulou and Tim Vlandas explain that while these cultural explanations have some merit, there has been a tendency to overlook the importance of economic concerns about immigration for the electoral success of far right parties. Academics and pundits alike often attribute the rise of the far right to cultural threats....

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Europeanising ideologies: Understanding the EU’s complex relationship with ‘isms’

For much of its history, the EU has been portrayed as an attempt to move beyond the ideological divisions present at the national level. Yet in recent decades, European integration has increasingly been criticised from the standpoint that it functions as an ideological project itself – whether as an expression of neoliberalism, federalism, or other ‘isms’. Jonathan White argues that to politicise the EU is not just to critique it: by inserting the EU into a larger, more intelligible history,...

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Eurosceptic or Euro-ambivalent? Understanding the positions of far right parties on Europe

Most contemporary far right parties oppose European integration, but is Euroscepticism a natural complement to far right ideology? Marta Lorimer writes that while we now tend to see far right parties as Eurosceptic, this was not always the case. Drawing on an analysis of the Italian Social Movement and French Front National, she demonstrates that ambivalence is an important part of the far right’s approach to Europe. Far right parties are well-known for their opposition to European...

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Disrupting supply chains: Why leaving the Single Market means systemic breakdown

The UK will leave the Single Market at the end of this year, with new rules set to be implemented that will have an important impact on British businesses. Monica Horten writes that these changes have the potential to lead to uncertainties of supply, price hikes and potentially shortages. Prompt action could alleviate the situation, but ignoring it will result in long term damage. When the UK finally quits the Single Market on 1 January, rule changes will come into effect for businesses. With...

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Book Review: French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic by Joseph Downing

In French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic, Joseph Downing offers a new examination of the lives and experiences of French Muslims in the face of persecution, intimidation and marginalisation. Challenging and deconstructing widespread stereotypes and misconceptions, this well-researched book makes an excellent contribution and will be a good reference for scholars interested in exploring this area, writes Isa Ishaq Ojibara. If you...

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British expatriates and the anti-Brexit backlash

A large number of British citizens live elsewhere in Europe and many have the right to vote in UK elections. Yet little is known about their political preferences given there are no designated overseas constituencies for expatriate representation. Drawing on new survey evidence, Paul Webb and Susan Collard write that while expatriate voters have traditionally been assumed to vote more often for the Conservative Party, this no longer seems to apply for those living in EU countries following...

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The UK labour market and Covid-19: How to measure excess, where to look for it, and what it shows

Think the outlook for the UK labour market in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic looks bad? But just how bad? And along which dimensions? Jonathan Wadsworth answers these questions. He concludes that the crisis was marked by higher absences from work as well as a large rise in short-time working and hiring freezes, not by wage cuts and mass layoffs.  In a rapidly evolving crisis, there is a need for timely information to assess labour market performance and develop strategies to address the...

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Can ‘dodgy data’ explain the UK’s productivity problem?

An article in The Economist recently suggested that the UK’s ‘productivity problem’ may be a product of the Office for National Statistics failing to estimate prices in the telecommunications industry accurately. Bob Hancké writes that this is unlikely to explain why UK productivity appears to lag behind countries like France and Germany. If the UK has failed to measure productivity correctly in the telecommunications sector, it is probable that everyone has made a similar mistake given all...

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The Eurogroup: No longer ‘jobs for the boys’?

The Eurogroup is due to appoint a new President, with Spanish finance minister Nadia Calviño viewed as the favourite to take over from outgoing President Mário Centeno. Iain Begg explains that if Calviño is successful, it would be a notable step for gender equality. However, the decision will also be a litmus test for the direction the EU takes in economic policy and will signal how much of a consensus there is on shifting away from the economic paradigm prevailing prior to the pandemic....

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Young people exposed to an epidemic have less trust in political institutions for the rest of their lives

What impact will the Covid-19 outbreak have on levels of political trust? Cevat Giray Aksoy, Barry Eichengreen and Orkun Saka find that individuals who experience epidemics in their impressionable years display less confidence in political leaders, governments, and elections for the rest of their lives. It is widely argued (here, for instance) that the keys to success in dealing with Covid-19 are “whether citizens trust their leaders, and whether those leaders preside over a competent and...

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