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Tag Archives: representation

Some quasi-methodological reflections: a reply to Ghins and Ragazzoni

Share the post "Some quasi-methodological reflections: a reply to Ghins and Ragazzoni" Greg Conti offers a response to his reviewers in our “Parliamentary Thinking” book forum.  It was a pleasure for me to read the commentaries by David Ragazzoni and Arthur Ghins. These are among the most promising scholars writing about the history and theory of liberalism and democracy, and their insightful engagements with Parliament the Mirror of the Nation demonstrate well why...

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Democracy in the Mirror

Share the post "Democracy in the Mirror" This is the third review in our “Parliamentary Thinking” book forum. Review of Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation and Democracy in Victorian Britain by Gregory Conti (Cambridge University Press, 2019). In Political Political Theory (2016), Jeremy Waldron chided political theorists for studying ideals such as equality or liberty in a vacuum, in a way oblivious to the concrete institutional...

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There is little evidence European integration has created a representation gap between politicians and voters

Recent research suggests that European integration may have led political parties to adopt increasingly similar positions. This ideological convergence among parties could pose a democratic challenge if it also increases the gap between citizens and their representatives. Drawing on a new study, Daniel Devine and Raimondas Ibenskas find little evidence that the integration process has reduced the level of congruence between parties, governments and parliaments on one hand, and citizens...

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Why MPs do not represent everyone equally well

Disproportionate numbers of politicians within national parliaments are male, affluent and belonging to the ‘native’ majority of their country. But while the composition of a parliament may not reflect the composition of society, does this affect the representation of citizens’ views? Drawing on new research in Germany, Lea Elsässer, Svenja Hense and Armin Schäfer demonstrate that the views of particular groups are consistently underrepresented in policymaking, with much of this effect...

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Alain Bertho : Le temps des révoltes

Share the post "Alain Bertho : Le temps des révoltes" Alors que les manifestations et les révoltes se multiplient au niveau mondial depuis deux ans, notre stagiaire Justin Saint-Loubert-Bié a interviewé Alain Bertho, professeur d’anthropologie à l’Université de Paris 8 et expert sur les révoltes, la mondialisation et l’altermondialisme. La conversation porta sur son essai Les enfants du chaos : Essai sur le temps des martyrs (Éditions La Découverte, 2016) et son...

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On Parliamentarism: A Reply to Varouxakis and Rubinelli

Share the post "On Parliamentarism: A Reply to Varouxakis and Rubinelli" William Selinger offers a response to his reviewers in our “Parliamentary Thinking” book forum.  It is a pleasure to respond to Georgios Varouxakis and Lucia Rubinelli’s commentaries on Parliamentarism: From Burke to Weber. I could not have hoped for two more careful and insightful engagements with this book. Because Varouxakis has provided an in-depth description of the book’s contents, I will...

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Judith Shklar’s Teaching Statement

Share the post "Judith Shklar’s Teaching Statement" Judith Shklar has a provocative little essay called “Why Teach Political Theory?” Crafting the response she might give to “some imaginary dean,” Shklar emphasizes that a liberal education is about familiarizing the young with their literary heritage, and it’s hard to deny that the classics of political theory are at the center of that heritage. Sending the autodidact into the library isn’t enough. We need the...

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