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Tag Archives: UK renegotiation

Brexit and Scottish independence: Does campaign information actually change voters’ minds during a referendum?

Both sides of the UK’s referendum campaign have invested huge resources in trying to convince the electorate to back their viewpoint, but how effective are these efforts in actually changing the minds of voters? Drawing on research in the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence, Davide Morisi illustrates how information can have an impact on the views of the electorate. He notes that much like the pro-independence side in Scotland, the leave campaign’s success will hinge on whether they...

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What those calling for Brexit could learn from the Greek bailout referendum

In the summer of 2015, Greece held a referendum on a proposed bailout deal, with the electorate decisively rejecting the proposal. Kevin Featherstone writes that much like the upcoming referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU, the referendum in Greece was accompanied by the rise of populist campaigning in which emotional appeals had greater resonance than economic evidence. Following the result, however, the romanticism of the campaign quickly gave way to political and economic...

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The ‘Britain Alone’ scenario: how Economists for Brexit defy the laws of gravity

There is a degree of consensus among economists that a Brexit will make us worse off. The exception is recent work by Economists for Brexit. Their forecast of income gains from Brexit contrasts with all other economic analysis, explain Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen. The possibility of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) has generated an unusual degree of consensus among economists. Acrimony and rancour surrounded debates around austerity and...

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Support for Brexit is no longer a minority viewpoint on the British left

In recent years, Euroscepticism has frequently been associated with the right of the political spectrum in the UK, but a number of figures on the left have also voiced their support for the country leaving the EU. Imke Henkel writes that while criticism of the EU’s handling of the Eurozone and migration crises is understandable, such problems should be used as the basis for stronger engagement from the British left at the European level. Among the British press, which overall shows a bias...

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The economic case for a Brexit

What effect would a Brexit have on the UK’s economy? Kent Matthews gives three reasons why Britain leaving the EU may have a positive economic impact for the country. He argues that a Brexit would reduce prices, free businesses from over-zealous regulations, and allow the UK to redirect the money it currently pays into the EU budget toward more pressing priorities. The most compelling arguments for a Brexit are not necessarily economic ones. The matter of sovereignty, rule by bureaucracy,...

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Brexit Ambassador series: The view from Turkey

If Britain chose to leave the European Union, it would not only have an effect inside the UK, but also on the rest of Europe. In the final month of the referendum campaign, we will be featuring comments from some of Europe’s Ambassadors to the UK on how they view a potential Brexit. Abdurrahman Bilgiç, the Turkish Ambassador, explains why his country hopes the UK remains within the EU. It is always an enriching experience for diplomats to witness historical moments in their host countries....

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Laws born out of trauma: in defence of the EU’s conception of human rights

With both the EU and human rights demonised in public discourse, Catherine Dupré sets out to redeem the concepts from their critics. She argues that the EU’s conception of human rights, as codified in its Charter of Fundamental Rights, defines a set of absolute rights borne out of wartime trauma and transcending the limitations of a conception of the human that is driven by merely economic concerns. It protects the weak from exploitation at the hands of the powerful and offers a...

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Never mind Brexit scaremongering – Turkey is a long way from joining the EU

There have been competing claims within the context of the UK’s EU referendum campaign over the prospect of Turkey joining the EU in the near future. David Phinnemore and Erhan İçener argue that the notion Turkey is close to joining the EU has been overstated by those campaigning for a Brexit, and that regardless of the merits of Turkey’s application for membership, it will be extremely difficult for the country to join due to opposition within the EU’s member states. The anti-immigration...

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The economics of Brexit: which side should we believe?

One of the key issues in the context of the UK’s EU referendum is the effect a Brexit would have on the country’s economy. Iain Begg assesses the economic claims that have been made so far in the campaign, noting that there have been misleading figures put forward by both sides of the debate. Two recent assessments of the economics of Brexit, from the Treasury and a new group calling itself Economists for Brexit, come to diametrically opposed conclusions. They add to an array of claims and...

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What the UK could learn from Ireland’s EU referendum campaigns

Ireland has held several referendums on EU issues, with both the Treaty of Nice and the Treaty of Lisbon being rejected by the electorate, before subsequently being approved in second referendums. Gavin Barrett outlines five lessons the British government could learn from the Irish experience, including the feasibility of the UK holding its own second referendum should the country vote to leave the EU on 23 June. With the UK’s referendum on exiting the EU drawing inexorably closer, and...

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