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Tag Archives: cold war

Samuel Moyn’s Humane – Full Forum

Share the post "Samuel Moyn’s Humane – Full Forum" ** Last week, Tocqueville 21 published a book forum consisting of four reviews of Samuel Moyn’s new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War followed by a response from Moyn. We have now compiled the full book forum (with an introduction) as a PDF. ** In the aftermath of the United States military’s chaotic withdrawal after a twenty-year occupation of Afghanistan, few deny that America’s...

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Samuel Moyn Responds

Share the post "Samuel Moyn Responds" ** This response from Samuel Moyn completes the Tocqueville 21 forum on his new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War. Four reviews of Humane, by Duncan Bell, Michael Brenes, Emma Mackinnon, and Mel Pavlik, were published earlier this week. ** I am exceptionally grateful to Duncan Bell, Michael Brenes, Emma Mackinnon, and Mel Pavlik for taking their valuable time to read and respond to Humane, and...

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The Horror and the Humanity

Share the post "The Horror and the Humanity" ** This is the fourth in a series of four reviews of Samuel Moyn’s new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War. Each day this week one review will be published. On Friday, Moyn will respond. ** When urged by a fellow soldier to draw comfort from ‘ideals’ amidst the chaos and inhumanity of World War II, Joseph Heller’s protagonist Yossarian scoffs. “When I look up,” he retorts, “I see people...

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Duped by Morality

Share the post "Duped by Morality" ** This is the third in a series of four reviews of Samuel Moyn’s new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War. Each day this week one review will be published. On Friday, Moyn will respond. ** Samuel Moyn’s Humane offers an indictment of efforts to sanitize or humanize war, tracking how such efforts have ultimately enabled apparently endless and profoundly asymmetrical forms of warfare. Moyn argues that...

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American War from Sherman to McChrystal

Share the post "American War from Sherman to McChrystal" ** This is the second in a series of four reviews of Samuel Moyn’s new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War. Each day this week one review will be published. On Friday, Moyn will respond. ** “It became necessary to destroy the town to save it,” stated an anonymous United States Major in February 1968 following the destruction of the Vietnamese city Bến Tre during the Tet...

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Dissolving the Dream of Peace

Share the post "Dissolving the Dream of Peace" ** This is the first in a series of four reviews of Samuel Moyn’s new book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War. Each day this week one review will be published. On Friday, Moyn will respond. ** To write compellingly about the history of international law for a general audience is no mean feat, but Sam Moyn, describing himself as an old dog having to learn new tricks (383), has pulled it off....

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Revue de Presse: May 30

Share the post "Revue de Presse: May 30" For the first time in its history, the European Union will arm foreign governments in the name of fighting terrorism, protecting civilians, and stabilizing fragile states, using a €5 billion “European Peace Facility.” Michael Peel discusses this newest development in the EU’s effort to extend its “hard power” in the Financial Times. Critics fear the money will entrench dictatorships and stoke conflict, undermining the EU’s...

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Revue de Presse: April 25

This week, multiple articles highlight the continued waffling of the professional foreign policy establishment. In The National Interest, David V. Gioe offers a vision of American security imperatives wherein concerns abroad must necessarily take a backseat to domestic affairs.  Meanwhile, in Foreign Policy, Daniel Baer argues for a renewal of American strategic engagement by rendering foreign policy imperatives more tangible for average Americans. Also writing for Foreign Policy, Stephen...

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A Global Contract to Avoid Climate Conflict

This entry was a finalist in our inaugural Blogging Democracy Contest. University of Chicago undergraduates were asked, “Does climate crisis demand a new social contract?” Below is Kendall Chappell’s reply.  Rising temperatures are making the world more violent. With the global temperature expected to increase two or more standard deviations by 2050, researchers predict that the average rate of person-to-person conflict will increase 4.6 percent, while intergroup conflict could rise as...

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The Civil War as Revolution

Share the post "The Civil War as Revolution" Americans tend to forget that our Revolution was also a civil war, and our Civil War was also a revolution. The War for Independence is overshadowed by the drama of inspired statesmen creating an entirely new Republic. Only military specialists care whether George Washington was lucky or skillful as a general. What matters is that he could have seized absolute power and didn’t. Our collective memory of the Civil War is...

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